Turn me over, brothers, I am done enough on this side

Tag: reading

Narcissus

Quote of the Day: On the Fear of Narcissism

In this way, Morton argues, our need to get a more immediate, superficial sharing, and to feel good about ourselves as a result, protects us from recognizing our deeper and more threatening sharing, a more terrifying similarity: we’ve done things more like the murderer than we can bear. It’s not a crass relativism, Morton’s idea;… Read More ›

Andrea Mantegna, St. Sebastian (Louvre)

Quote of the Day: On Cocteau and Proust

If Proust visited his rituals on Cocteau, friendship with Proust could not be otherwise than ritualistic.  It involved verbal spoofs, labyrinthine excuses, nocturnal happenings, dinners at the Ritz, and whipped chocolate at Larue, recitations from Swann in the cork-lined bedroom, cab rides observing the fixed, hermetic itinerary of a drunk.  Proust’s rare outings by day… Read More ›

I want a dog

I Want a Dog

Now here’s this, because I know what she’s thinking about . . . sigh. This animated short is based on the book I Want A Dog, by Dayal Kaur Khalsa. We have it on DVD, as part of a set of short films from Scholastic based on, and using the illustrations from, great children’s picture books…. Read More ›

Quote of the Day: Foucault on Transgression

  Transgression is an action which involves the limit, that narrow zone of a line where it displays the flash of its passage, but perhaps also its entire trajectory, even its origin; it is likely that transgression has its entire space in the line it crosses. The play of limits and transgression incessantly crosses and… Read More ›

Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita

I’m very excited because I just heard, via one of my favorite reading-related sites, LitHub, that Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel The Master and Margarita is being made into a movie.  I only just found out about the book and read it a couple of years ago, and I was just thinking about re-reading it, I loved it so much.  Some reviewers argue pretty… Read More ›

Quote of the Day: J. M. Coetzee, Life & Times of Michael K

He thought of his mother. She had asked him to bring her back to her birthplace and he had done so, though perhaps only by a trick of words. But what if this farm was not her true birthplace? Where were the stone walls of the wagonhouse she had spoken of? He made himself pay… Read More ›

Track of the Day: Fleet Foxes, The Shrine/An Argument (BBC Maida Vale Session). Plus a few words on Yeats.

My favorite among the Fleet Foxes songs from the sessions recorded at the BBC’s Maida Vale studios (actually, among any of their recordings).  This one has a transcendent quality; everything is still for a little while when it ends.  For me, anyway. I find myself charmed by the little inner reference to Yeats’ “The Lake Isle of Innisfree,” it’s done sweetly and without… Read More ›

Ludwig Erhard Haus, Architecture

Quote of the Day: John Gray on J. G. Ballard

In the course of his life Ballard creatively deployed a remarkably wide range of different styles and genres, but nearly all of his novels and most of his short stories seem to me to explore a single theme. Whether the subject is an apocalyptic shift in the environment as in The Drowned World (1962) and The Drought (1964), mental breakdown… Read More ›

Scene from a WalMart in Missouri

My first real boyfriend from high school once told me that people might stop thinking of me as aloof and cold if only they could see what delight I took in walking into possibly the last Taco Tico restaurant anywhere and having my feet stick to the floor a little with each step.  Taco Tico was forbidden fruit when I was… Read More ›

Richter plays Ravel, “Le Gibet.” Plus some thoughts on French Romantic poetry.

Sviatoslav Richter playing Maurice Ravel’s “Le Gibet,” the second of the suite of pieces for solo piano titled Gaspard de la Nuit: Trois poèmes pour piano d’après Aloysius Bertrand.  Recorded live in Moscow, 1954. “Le gibet” is composed around a grisly subject: in the original poem, the dead occupant of the gibbet (gallows) is described in painstakingly lurid detail.  The poem seems to… Read More ›

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